History

Sofia Storage - History and Timeline

Theodoro Sofia traveled from Italy to America and settled on Intervale Avenue in the Bronx, NY.1880 – 1899: Theodoro Sofia traveled from Italy to America in the 1880’s to start a better life. After settling on Intervale Avenue in the Bronx, NY, he sent for his childhood sweetheart, Theresa, whom he married.Their family grew to include six sons and two daughters.

1900-1909: Theodoro’s eldest son Charles worked down the street at the Intervale Avenue Stables and soon became the stable manager.

Intervale Stables

1910- 1919: In 1910, the opportunity arose to buy the stable, and with the help of their mother, three of their sons Frank, Theodore, and John, began Sofia Brothers. When more and more requests to help haul large items using their horses and wagons, they found themselves in the moving business. Soon after, it was time for the Sofia Brothers to make another change and they decided to convert the building from Intervale boarding Stables to their first storage warehouse.

1920-1929: As other businesses grew during this era, so did Sofia Brothers. With a need to expand, the Sofia Brothers built their second warehouse at 4396 Broadway in Washington Heights which became their main location.Sofia Bro's First Storage location

1930-1939: Sofia Brothers business survived the depression, however they suffered the loss of founding brother, Frank.

1940-1949: WWII caused many people to emigrate to NY, and Sofia Brothers overseas packing and crating business expanded. The Sofias’ purchased a second building, Kent Garage at 43 West 61st Street, which once converted, became the tallest warehouse in the world. Sofia Brothers were agents for North American Van Lines.

1950-1959: In 1952, Theodore and John acquired the Metropolitan Storage Warehouse at 475 Amsterdam Avenue on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. In 1955 the second of the founding brothers, Theodore, passed away. His sons, Theodore Jr. and Alan, joined the company and helped to expand the commercial moving and storage division.One of Sofia Brothers first moving trucks

1954: Sofia Brothers moved Ohrbach’s Department Store.

1960-1969: John Sofia’s sons, Frank, John Jr. and Leonard joined the company. Business expands into Brooklyn with the acquisition of the Peter F. Reilly Storage Warehouse as well as downtown Manhattan, with the purchase of 139 Franklin Street.

1963: Sofia Brothers were chosen by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to transport the priceless Mona Lisa.Sofia Brothers built their second warehouse at 4396 Broadway and expands their fleet.

1976-1978: Sofia Brothers & North American Van Lines moved King Tut Exhibit around the U.S.A.

1980’s: Sofia Brothers moved multiple tenants into 277 Park Avenue.
Sofia Brothers moved the first tenant into One Astor Plaza

1983: Sofia Brothers chosen to move Bank of America into new offices. Third generation Loren and Frank Jr. join Sofia Brothers.

1990’s: Sofia Brothers De-emphasized their moving business in order to concentrate on residential and commercial storage. Third Generation Tom Sofia Joins the firm.John Sofia Sr. cofounder of Sofia Brothers Inc. With foresight and determination built a business that has survived over 100 years.

2010: Sofia Brothers celebrates their 100th Anniversary!

2011: As Sofia Brothers celebrates it’s 101st year anniversary, another member of the Sofia family, Amy Sofia, joins the Sofia team.

Additional Images

Sofia Brothers were agents for North American Van Lines

The Sofia’s acquired Metropolitan Storage Warehouse at 475 Amsterdam Avenue on Manhattan’s Upper West Side

Sofia Brother’s moved Ohrbach’s Department Store

The Sofias’ purchased the Kent Garage at 43 West 61st Street, which once converted, became the tallest warehouse in the world

1963 Sofia Brothers chosen by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to transport the priceless Mona Lisa

1976 -1978 Sofia Brothers & North American Van Lines moved the King Tut Exhibit around America

Sofia Brothers moved multiple tenants into 277 Park Avenue

Sofia Brothers moved the first tenant into One Astor Plaza